Tarry for the Nonce

May 18, 2006

Surprise. I am Mostly Catholic.

Filed under: Anecdotes — lmwalker @ 2:53 pm

Shameful as it is to admit, I’ve never read anything he wrote.

You scored as Anselm.

Anselm is the outstanding theologian of the medieval period.He sees man’s primary problem as having failed to render unto God what we owe him, so God becomes man in Christ and gives God what he is due. You should read ‘Cur Deus Homo?’

Anselm

93%

Friedrich Schleiermacher

93%

Karl Barth

87%

Augustine

80%

John Calvin

67%

Jonathan Edwards

67%

Charles Finney

47%

J?Moltmann

40%

Paul Tillich

40%

Martin Luther

27%

Which theologian are you?

This next quiz was tougher, because I don’t have strong opinions on the subject. I think that Revelations reveals more about the liturgy than the end times.

You scored as Amillenialist.

Amillenialism believes that the 1000 year reign is not literal but figurative, and that Christ began to reign at his ascension. People take some prophetic scripture far too literally in your view.

Amillenialist

95%

Moltmannian Eschatology

75%

Preterist

55%

Postmillenialist

55%

Premillenialist

45%

Dispensationalist

45%

Left Behind

30%

What’s your eschatology?

Considering the ambiguity I felt in some of the questions, I was surprised that I scored so strongly Roman Catholic in the next quiz. I guess I agreed on the essentials . . .

You scored as Roman Catholic.

You are Roman Catholic. Church tradition and ecclesial authority are hugely important, and the most important part of worship for you is mass. As the Mother of God, Mary is important in your theology, and as the communion of saints includes the living and the dead, you can also ask the saints to intercede for you.

Roman Catholic

100%

Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan

79%

Neo orthodox

71%

Emergent/Postmodern

61%

Fundamentalist

46%

Classical Liberal

46%

Charismatic/Pentecostal

43%

Reformed Evangelical

21%

Modern Liberal

18%

What’s your theological worldview?

I am glad to know that I am not a heretic, although the dash of Pelagianism has me worried. Did I not read the questions correctly?

You scored as Chalcedon compliant.

You are Chalcedon compliant. Congratulations, you’re not a heretic. You believe that Jesus is truly God and truly man and like us in every respect, apart from sin. Officially approved in 451.

Chalcedon compliant

100%

Pelagianism

67%

Nestorianism

33%

Monophysitism

33%

Docetism

0%

Arianism

0%

Apollanarian

0%

Adoptionist

0%

Donatism

0%

Gnosticism

0%

Monarchianism

0%

Albigensianism

0%

Modalism

0%

Socinianism

0%

Are you a heretic?

(Another hat tip to Brian Preston for all quiz links!)

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7 Comments

  1. The heretic test is faulty. I suspect the problem has to do with nuances of theology which it cannot properly detect. Catholics get a 100% rating as Chacedon compliant, but are still rated as Pelagians, as well as other lesser degrees of heresy.

    >The spiritual state of the minister does not nullify the value of the sacraments, not now, not ever. This safeguard is vital to preserving confidence in the efficacy of the sacraments.

    1. The Eucharist is not effective if it is administered by a leader who is sinful. DISAGREE

    3. A baptism is invalid if performed by a minister who later renounces his faith. DISAGREE

    16. The efficacy of sacraments depend on the moral status of those administering them. DISAGREE

    >God is the Creator of all things and what God creates is good. Matter and spirit are both good.

    2. All material things were created by Satan. DISAGREE

    5. God is Spirit, and so spirit is good. Matter is bad. DISAGREE

    10. Jesus was not really God incarnate, because God cannot indwell corrupted matter. DISAGREE

    15. God is Spirit, not matter, so Jesus’ body was spiritual and only seemed like it was physical. DISAGREE

    23. Created matter is fallen and corrupt, so Jesus did not take on full human nature. DISAGREE

    26. Salvation will ultimately involve an escape from physical reality. DISAGREE (with qualifications)

    Certainly the glorified body of Christ, which points to characteristics of our own immortality, will be liberated from many of the retraints of time and space. However, we also believe in the resurrection of the body. Jesus rose from the dead and Mary was assumed body and soul into heaven.

    29. Suicide is a good way to get rid of the evil of the body. DISAGREE

    31. The body is evil, and so will not be resurrected. DISAGREE

    >Jesus is a divine Person, the Second Person of the Trinity. He has both a complete human nature and a divine nature. There is no confusion or blending of his natures. It is necessary that Christ has a complete human nature: whatever is not assumed, is not redeemed.

    4. Jesus is God and man in one person AGREE

    7. Jesus did not have two natures (human and divine) he had one new composite nature. DISAGREE

    8. Miracles show Jesus divinity. Hunger shows his humanity. AGREE (with qualifications)

    The miracles indeed point to his divinity although others in the history of salvation had also performed wondrous signs. His miracles and the forgiveness of sins, in union with his words reveal his divinty to us. As a real human being, he could thirst and hunger like all men.

    9. Jesus was raised from the dead and united with God as a reward for his obedience. DISAGREE (with qualifications)

    Certainly Jesus was faithful to his mission and his resurrection was vindication by his Father over the foul conviction of evil men. But Jesus is God and the hypostatic union is never compromised. Further, the reward for his obedience is our redemption. While biblical language will sometimes speak of Jesus being “raised” we also understand that he rises from the dead by his own power.

    10. Jesus was not really God incarnate, because God cannot indwell corrupted matter. DISAGREE

    11. God cannot co-exist with matter, Jesus only appeared to be fully human. DISAGREE

    15. God is Spirit, not matter, so Jesus’ body was spiritual and only seemed like it was physical. DISAGREE

    17. Jesus is two persons; one human and one divine. DISAGREE

    21. Jesus’ mind was divine, not merely human. AGREE

    23. Created matter is fallen and corrupt, so Jesus did not take on full human nature. DISAGREE

    22. Jesus was not eternally pre-existent, he was rather a deified man. DISAGREE

    32 God is the Father, and Jesus is only a man. DISAGREE

    33. ‘Son of God’ refers to Jesus’ divine nature only. As man he is simply the ‘firstborn’. DISAGREE (with qualifications)

    Jesus is God and man, whole and complete. The term “firstborn” simply can be understood in reference to the Holy Family in terms of Christ’s humanity; however, in reference to the heavenly Father, it means he is the ONLY Son of God which also includes his divinity. God the Son comes to exist in time. However, Jesus cannot be dissected. The statement here is confusing.

    34. Jesus divine and human natures are in no way confused or annulled by their union with each other. AGREE

    36. Jesus was given supernatural powers and made the Son of God at his baptism. DISAGREE

    37. Jesus’ humanity was absorbed to produce one new divine nature. DISAGREE

    38. God exists in singular unity, there can be no human-divine union. DISAGREE

    39 Jesus’ ordinary human soul was overcome by the the divine Logos inside him. DISAGREE (with qualifications)

    There is a mystery here. Jesus is a divine person and how such interacts with a human soul is not for us to absolutely know. However, we believe that Jesus had real “experiential” knowledge, something that is made possible by the human soul or mind. His divinity did not destroy elements of his humanity. Neither was there any substitution other than his ultimate identity as a divine person.

    40. The divine Logos replaced Jesus’ human nature in the incarnation. DISAGREE

    41. Jesus is at once complete in Godhead and manhood. AGREE

    42. Only Jesus’ human nature died on on the cross. AGREE (with qualifications)

    God as a perfect spirit has no parts that can break down or die. Thus, God as spirit cannot die. God’s Son took upon himself a human nature that was liable to suffering and death. However, we must avoid Nestorianism. Nestorius objected to the Marian title, “Theotokos” or God-Bearer, known in the West as MOTHER OF GOD. Mary, however, was the mother of the whole identity of her Son, which in this singular case, happened to be God. Similarly, given the unity of Christ, human and divine, the Church also says that in Jesus Christ, “God dies on the Cross.” This is a particular form of language, more readily applied in Latin than in Greek. It is called “communicatio idiomata”.

    >God is a Trinity: three divine persons but one divine nature. He exists as such from all eternity.

    6. God is one person, but exists in three forms as Father, Son and Spirit. DISAGREE

    12. God is a single person with the Holy Spirit as the power of God. DISAGREE

    13. The Holy Spirit is the presence of God the Father. DISAGREE (with qualifications)

    Strict identification of one person of the Trinity with another is the heresy of modalism. The three divine persons of the Trinity are distinct. However, each conveys the presence of God. This is where the confusion rests in the statement.

    18. On the cross, God was manifest as the Son. He is now manifest as the Holy Spirit. DISAGREE (with qualifications)

    It is true that Jesus is the revelation of the Father and in Jesus, God dies on the Cross. It also true that some authorities speak of the current period in history as the age of the Holy Spirit. However, we hold for no form of either modalism or adoptionism. This statement is very unclear as to what it means. Jesus is still God, as are the Holy Spirit and the Father.

    20. Jesus is of one substance with the Father in his divine nature. AGREE

    22. Jesus was not eternally pre-existent, he was rather a deified man. DISAGREE

    24. Jesus’ human nature is lesser than his divine nature. AGREE (with qualifications)

    Both natures are whole and complete, but God chose to take upon himself a human nature. He did this out of love for us, but not out of necessity. The infinite quality of divine nature and its inseparability from the very definition of the Godhead mandates that it is rated of a higher order than human nature. However, human nature remains good along the lines of its own properties. Indeed, in Christ it is raised up and perfected.

    25. The Father, Son, and Spirit all exist, but never at the same time. DISAGREE

    28. Only God the Father is eternal, and he produced the Son out of nothing. DISAGREE

    30. There is one God who exists as one person. DISAGREE

    32. God is the Father, and Jesus is only a man. DISAGREE

    35. Having been the first creation of the Father, the Son then created the Holy Spirit. DISAGREE

    36. Jesus was given supernatural powers and made the Son of God at his baptism. DISAGREE

    37. Jesus’ humanity was absorbed to produce one new divine nature. DISAGREE

    38. God exists in singular unity, there can be no human-divine union. DISAGREE

    The primordial rebellion breeched our relationship with God and we needed a Savior to redeem us. Faith and baptism are the ordinary means of availing ourselves of the salvific graces merited by Christ. Baptism washes away the original sin inherited from sinful Adam.

    14. We have not inherited original sin from Adam. DISAGREE

    >Everything is grace! We could not call out to Jesus as Lord if God’s grace did not move us and give us the gift of faith. There is both salvific and actual (helping) grace.

    19. God’s grace is an aid to help people come to him. AGREE

    27. We can obey the commands that God has given us. This is why some people in the OT were righteous. AGREE (with qualifications)

    Actually the righteous of the Old Testament were judged so because of their faithfulness to God. God called them and they answered his call. Indeed, Catholics view obedience as an important definition of faith. What prevents pelagianism is that such a disposition allows God’s grace to sanctify us. He helps us to be faithful and obedient and then rewards us as his children.

    Comment by Father Joe — May 18, 2006 @ 9:30 pm

  2. Oops, how insensitive I can be, if these answers might destroy the experience of the test, feel free to quickly delete the previous comment.

    I say too much.

    What was I thinking?

    Peace!

    Comment by Father Joe — May 18, 2006 @ 9:49 pm

  3. It has been a long time since I took those tests. I believe I scored the same results as Laura.

    Comment by Brian — May 19, 2006 @ 12:25 am

  4. Which theologian are you?

    You scored as Karl Barth.

    (I don’t think this guy who made this test has heard of Aquinas!)

    The daddy of 20th Century theology. You perceive liberal theology to be a disaster and so you insist that the revelation of Christ, not human experience, should be the starting point for all theology.

    Anselm 87%
    Karl Barth 87%
    Jonathan Edwards 73%
    Augustine 67%
    John Calvin 67%
    Charles Finney 53%
    Friedrich Schleiermacher 47%
    Paul Tillich27%
    J?Moltmann 27%
    Martin Luther 27%

    What’s your eschatology?

    You scored as Amillenialist.

    Amillenialism believes that the 1000 year reign is not literal but figurative, and that Christ began to reign at his ascension. People take some prophetic scripture far too literally in your view.

    Amillenialist 70%
    Moltmannian Eschatology 50%
    Premillenialist 50%
    Postmillenialist 40%
    Dispensationalist 25%
    Left Behind 20%
    Preterist 15%

    You scored as Roman Catholic.

    (What? Me “not” %100 Catholic? I think the problem lies in the test, not my answers.) 😉

    You are Roman Catholic. Church tradition and ecclesial authority are hugely important, and the most important part of worship for you is mass. As the Mother of God, Mary is important in your theology, and as the communion of saints includes the living and the dead, you can also ask the saints to intercede for you.

    Roman Catholic 93%
    Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan 86%
    Neo orthodox 75%
    Fundamentalist 75%
    Charismatic/Pentecostal 46%
    Modern Liberal 36%
    Reformed Evangelical 32%
    Emergent/Postmodern 32%
    Classical Liberal 29%

    Are you a heretic?

    You are Chalcedon compliant. Congratulations, you’re not a heretic. You believe that Jesus is truly God and truly man and like us in every respect, apart from sin. Officially approved in 451.

    Chalcedon compliant 100%
    Pelagianism 50%
    Apollanarian 50%
    Nestorianism 42%
    Adoptionist 33%
    Monophysitism 33%
    Monarchianism 17%
    Arianism 0%
    Socinianism 0%
    Docetism 0%
    Donatism 0%
    Modalism 0%
    Gnosticism 0%
    Albigensianism 0%

    Comment by Dave R — May 19, 2006 @ 10:00 am

  5. Don’t worry about it, Father Joe. The test isn’t the same for everyone.

    Comment by laura — May 19, 2006 @ 10:46 am

  6. Yeah, where is Aquinas?

    I scored as Augustine – I honestly didn’t expect that at all!

    Thanks for the first post, Fr. Joe, as I was wondering what your answers would be as well as what was so fishy about that quiz. 🙂

    Comment by Genna — May 19, 2006 @ 9:50 pm

  7. Correction & Clarification:

    MODALISM reduces the Trinity to one person but argues that God reveals himself in three forms throughout salvation history. Modalists may also seek to define the Father, Son and Holy Spirit simply through distinct operations, like Creator, Redeemer and Sanctifier.

    SOCINIANISM also reduces the Trinity to one person and speaks of the Holy Spirit as the power of God. They also denied any divine-human unity (Christ).

    MONARCHIANISM stressed the oneness of God to the detriment of the Trinity, too. Both modalism and adoptionism are forms of monarchianism.

    Comment by Father Joe — May 21, 2006 @ 4:56 pm


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