Tarry for the Nonce

December 9, 2005

A-Maize-ing

Filed under: News — lmwalker @ 4:58 pm

The concept of a corn-burning stove is genius!

Once relegated to farmhouses and cabins, corn-burning and more common wood-burning stoves began growing in popularity four years ago among environmentally-minded consumers interested in cheaper and renewable energy sources . . .

Haefner said there were about 65,000 corn stoves sold in the US last year. He expects about 150,000 will be sold this year and at least 350,000 next year.

Even with a retail price of 1,600 to 3,000 dollars, the stoves often pay for themselves within a year or two . . .

Corn-generated heat costs less than a fifth of the current rate for propane and about a third of electrical heat, according to Haefner. Homeowners report savings of anywhere from 600 to 1,500 dollars a year, he said.

Because of the space needed to store the dried corn kernels burned in the stoves, they are more popular in rural communities and suburbs than in big cities.

How do they work? How does it not turn into popcorn?

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3 Comments

  1. I could be wrong, but I thought “popcorn” required either a hybrid seed or special preparation. Otherwise, I wouldn’t think you’d be able to roast corn on the cob.

    I’ll be lighting a fire at my party this weekend; let’s try a science experiment.

    Comment by Howard R — December 13, 2005 @ 8:09 am

  2. My Illinois residency and farming experience compels me to include this link

    http://www.cyberspaceag.com/kansascrops/corn/typesofcorn.htm

    The corn that is burned is most likely yellow dent. It’s the majority of corn you see growing around and is primarily used for animal feed. It’s internal moisture doesn’t become sealed in to the bursting point when high temperature is applied.

    Will this get me a part in Napoleon Dynamite II?

    Comment by FRJTK — December 13, 2005 @ 10:43 am

  3. I wonder how much more or less space corn takes up vs the same amount of energy in wood?

    Comment by Howard R — December 13, 2005 @ 11:40 am


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